Renewed Call to Change Our Streets


Kerry Cycling Campaign and Cyclist.ie renew calls on the Irish government and Kerry County Council to urgently follow the lead of other European governments to allocate more space to active travel measures. These measures include allocating more space for active travel and controlling vehicle speed by introducing 30 km/hr speed limits in built up areas .


Speaking on behalf of Kerry Cycling Campaign, Anluan Dunne said: “we have written to KCC Chief Executive, Moira Murrell and to all elected representatives to request that space on our county’s streets be made for people who walk and cycle. A once in a lifetime opportunity exists to make our towns nicer to live and work in by reducing the number of cars and making it easier to walk and cycle. All at minimal cost to the Council and with really positive outcomes for people and businesses alike”


Recent research from Transport for London showed that people who cycle spend on average 40% more in their local shops than motorists. They also visit local shops more frequently and visit more than one shop in a single trip than motorists.


Keith Phelan of Kerry Cycling Campaign said: “cycling is part of the solution to the major economic difficulties that now face our local shops and businesses. We want to encourage people back to our town centres to have a coffee, to shop and buy their groceries. We don’t want soulless, hollowed out towns akin to out of town shopping centres. Vibrant, family friendly streets which are a destination in their own right is the goal. Decades of car-centric policies have failed our towns. There were a large number of shop closures pre Covid-19 which proves the old way was not working”


On Saturday 9 May, the UK transport secretary Grant Shapps announced a national plan to support ‘active transport’ (walking and cycling) during and after the Covid-19 restrictions. The Transport Secretary’s action follows similar action by European governments and the release on 8 May of WHO guidance for local authorities – Strengthening Preparedness for COVID-19 in Cities and Urban Settings – in which it recommends the “promotion of safe active mobility (e.g. walking and cycling)”.


As a consequence of the Covid 19 shut-down, recent weeks have seen a complete reversal of numbers driving versus numbers walking and cycling. However, from Monday, May 18th business will begin to open on a phased basis and traffic will increase.

Dublin City Council is, to date, the only Irish local authority implementing substantial traffic measures to improve safety for people cycling and walking during the pandemic. Kerry Cycling Campaign cautiously welcome the words of Shane Ross, Minster for Transport, Tourism and Sport in the Dáil in the past week, when he stated that the National Transport Authority (NTA) would work with local authorities in Cork, Limerick, Galway and Waterford to develop a Covid mobility framework.

It is with some disappointment that large regional towns such as Tralee, Killarney, Ennis, Sligo and Letterkenny were not referred to by Minister Ross.

Speaking on behalf of Cyclist.ie and its 20 plus member organisations across Ireland, National Cycling Coordinator, Dr. Damien Ó Tuama, said that “Initially the required segregated space can be secured quickly and cheaply by reallocating road space using a combination of wands, bollards, orcas and planters”. Mr O’Tuama stated that “In addition other measures were needed and cyclist.ie would be happy to engage with government to discuss these. However, the immediate priorities are more space and less speed.”


Kerry Cycling Campaign’s Anluan Dunne spoke to Radio Kerry about how public spaces in towns and villages need to be re-imagined in the wake of the pandemic.

<a href="https://media.radiokerry.ie/upload/radiokerry/audio/2020.05.20_covid.mp3">https://media.radiokerry.ie/upload/radiokerry/audio/2020.05.20_covid.mp3</a>

Covid-19: Change Our Streets Campaign

Kerry Cycling Campaign calls on Kerry County Council and councillors to urgently ‘Change Our Streets’ by reallocating road space to people walking and cycling. We need to reduce hazards to help people maintain social or physical distancing measures during the Covid-19 emergency.

Communication has been made to all Kerry County Councillors and the Chief Executive of Kerry County Council Moira Murrell.

The outbreak of the COVID-19 virus has led to a huge increase in people cycling and walking. A growing number of countries around the world are temporarily reallocating road space from motor vehicles to people on foot and on bikes. Both to keep essential workers moving and to enable residents in lockdown to stay healthy and active while socially distancing.

“We need to ensure our county is safe for people walking or cycling to shops or work, for people exercising with 2 km of their homes and especially people with prams or wheelchairs. Cities and towns all over the world are trialing changes to roads and streets, some of which may be useful after the pandemic. We can Change Our Streets in Kerry with low-cost quick-wins.”

Keith Phelan, Kerry Cycling Campaign

Kerry Cycling Campaign has written to Kerry County Council and councillors to request the following changes:

  • Cones to widen footpaths in town/village centres or outside shops/queue areas
  • Temporary use of cones or bollards to create quietways to stop through traffic in housing estates and make roads for play/exercise
  • Repurposing of full lanes to cycle lanes
  • Temporary road pedestrianisation
  • Signs indicating improved pedestrian priority at junctions, reducing risk of transmission via crossing buttons.

“We need to put in place emergency measures to help people safely travel by foot or by bike for essential errands, to travel to work or for exercise. More people than ever are walking and cycling during this coronavirus pandemic. To Change Our Streets is to make our streets safer now, and the future. We have contacted our public representatives and KCC Chief Executive Moira Murrell to ask them to act”

Anluan Dunne, Kerry Cycling Campaign

Given recent statements by Minister for Health, Simon Harris, we know that movement restrictions and social distancing measures will remain in place until a vaccine is developed. As such, it must be easy and tolerable for people to comply. If we Change Our Streets, the environment of our cities, towns and villages will help compliance to public health measures. As Dr Mike Ryan, Executive Director of the World Health Organization’s Health Emergencies Programme, says: “Move quickly; speed trumps perfection.

Martina Callanan, board member of Cyclist.ie – the Irish Cycling Advocacy Network

Dublin City Council is implementing measures in Ranelagh, Rathmines, Stonybatter, Dorset St and Capel St by removing loading bays and parking spaces by placing orcas and bollards. It is time to see the same positive action taken in the towns and villages of Co Kerry.

Kerry Cycling Campaign call for motorists to slow down

Kerry Cycling Campaign have called for motorists to slow down and take more care following a horrific month of road deaths and injuries. With so many people out walking and cycling within 2 kilometers of their homes motorists are asked to slow down and be careful. The dramatic reduction in traffic volumes has resulted in some drivers increasing their speed – particularly in urban areas.

Anluan Dunne speaking of the Kerry Cycling Campaign said “Quite simply drivers need to slow down. We are calling on the Gardaí to step up enforcement across the county – especially in urban areas. More people are out walking and cycling and due to physical distancing they may have to step onto the road to avoid each other”


The Road Safety Authority and Gardaí are aware of the issue. Nationally the picture is grim with road deaths up 24% on last year.

Anluan continued “with no other cars to slow drivers down, and with the way our roads are designed, people feel like they have the space to speed up and take more risks. This behaviour is literally killing people. All the preparation and actions to help to flatten the Covid-19 curve is of little use if people don’t take care of each other out on the roads. Speeding drivers are putting people walking and cycling at risk of being patients in our emergency departments. ”

The call has been echoed by Professor John Crown of St Vincent’s Hospital Dublin who has called for speed limits to be lowered during the COVID-19 emergency. Nationally, the Love30 campaign is asking for 50 kmh limits to be reduced to 30 kmh in urban areas.

Globally, road crashes are the leading cause of death among young people aged 15-29, and the second leading cause of death worldwide among young people aged 5-14.


Anluan Dunne of the Kerry Cycling Campaign joined Deirdre Walsh on Radio Kerry’s Talkabout show to discuss the issues.

Lee Valley Trail extension anounced

AS work begins on the construction of the new 10km Tralee to Fenit Greenway, Kerry County Council has announced plans for the extension of an adjacent walking and cycling route along the coast of Tralee Bay which would connect with the greenway and provide a new leisure amenity for the area.

The council is proposing to extend an existing Lee Valley Trail which has been developed in recent years from Ballymullen to Ballyard and from The Basin to Cockleshell.

Plans are being developed to continue this coastal route – which forms part of the North Kerry Way – as far as Spa village. This would allow users to connect to the new greenway at the Spa at the rear of the Oyster Tavern.

Minister of State at the Department of Transport, Tourism and Sport, Brendan Griffin TD recently visited the walkway at the of end of Cockleshell Road and discussed with councillors and officials the proposal to continue the walkway to The Spa, a distance of approximately two kilometers.

Subject to funding and the agreement of local landowners, the walkway and cycleway, when completed, would allow users to travel along the coast to The Spa, cross the road in Spa village and join the Fenitgreenway to continue their journey on foot or by bicycle.

It would effectively provide a looped route to and from Tralee via the greenway and the coastal walkway/cycleway and ultimately extend to Ballyseedy wood.

Kerry County Council looks forward to the extension of the route at the earliest opportunity. Meanwhile preliminary work is underway on the new Tralee-Fenit Greenway along the route of the old railway line, following the receipt of €3m from the Department of Transport, Tourism and Sport.

Kerry Cycling Campaign welcomes new overtaking law.

Kerry Cycling Campaign welcomes the introduction by Minister Shane Ross of new laws designed to improve safety for people who cycle on Irish roads which come into force today (12th of November).

The new laws will focus specifically on motorists who overtake cyclists dangerously and will result in steeper penalties for drivers than the existing laws for dangerous overtaking.

The announcement comes as a result of a long, dedicated safety campaign by Wexford man Phil Skelton, whose Staying Alive at 1.5 campaign aimed to create a specific safe overtaking distance for cyclists. While Minister Ross’ original safe overtaking distance law was ultimately rejected by the Attorney General, the new Dangerous Overtaking of a Cyclist law is a compromise.

Like all road safety legislation enforcement is key. An Garda Síochána need the means and will to enforce. Greater resources both physical and digital may be needed.

Police forces in nearby jurisdictions, such as West Midlands Police in the UK, frequently run “Close Pass” operations where police officers on bicycles target drivers who overtake them too closely.

In addition to active policing operations, we hope the new legislation will result in Gardaí being more willing and able to accept video footage from cyclists who have been overtaken dangerously. Many people who cycle, especially those who commute by bike, have started recording their journeys on helmet- or bike-mounted cameras, usually as a result of frequent near-miss incidents.

Keith Phelan, Chairperson of Kerry Cycling Campaign, says: “The new overtaking law is a small step in the right direction. We want cycling to be safe, attractive, and normal for as many people as possible. The people this law seeks to protect are your children, brothers, sisters, mothers, fathers going about their day and not just large groups of club cyclists. An Garda Síochána needs to be given the resources to enforce the rules of the road as part of reducing road danger.

“Anluan Dunne, of Kerry Cycling Campaign, says: “Improving driver behaviour is important, but it is only a small piece of the overall puzzle. We need a change in narrative from the media, from politicians and from the government to do away with commentary that pits drivers against cyclists in an adversarial way.

We are also in urgent need of improved cycling infrastructure which physically separates people on bikes from fast-moving motor traffic. Shane Ross and the Department of Transport are the only people who can provide the funding for such infrastructure. The allocation in the recent land transport budget was around 2% while the government’s own recommendation stated 10%. We are calling for more funding for cycling as a priority.”

Kerry’s first Critical Mass

In glorious weather around 60 cyclists took to the streets of Tralee on the last Friday of June as part of the first Kerry’s inaugural Critical Mass.

Critical Mass is a mass bicycle ride that takes place on the last Friday of each month in cities around the world, with further events planned for the last Friday of each month throughout the summer.

Critical Mass

Cycling is more than transportation, it is transformation, do you want safer more vibrant streets and towns, an easy way to reduce carbon emissions all while keeping fit and healthy ?

Then get on you bike and celebrate Bike Week for a leisurely cycle around Tralee.

Meet up in the town square from 6pm for a 6.30pm departure for a leisurely cycle around town.

This event will will take place in during Bike Week and as far as we are aware this will be the first Critical Mass in Kerry.

What is Critical Mass?

Critical Mass is a mass bicycle ride that takes place on the last Friday of each month in cities around the world.


Everyone is invited!
No one is in charge!

€6.5 for Kerry Greenways

So the rumors were true it was announced today that 2 greenways in Kerry are to share €6.5m in funding under the Project Ireland 2040 plan. €3 million is being allocated for the Tralee-Fenit greenway, while €3.5 million will go towards the North Kerry project from Listowel to Kilmorna.

Minister Griffin says this funding will ensure both projects will be fully completed and as both projects are “shovel ready”, and says it will only be a matter of months before work on the projects gets underway.

Minister Confident of Funding for Kerry Greenways

After some rumours last week we just received this statement from Minister Brendan Griffin, great news for the Great Southern Trail and Tralee-Fenit Greenway.

And good to hear that the funding previously committed to the South Kerry Greenway has been reserved.


Statement by Brendan Griffin TD, Minister of State for Tourism and Sport

Thursday, May 23rd, 2019

MINISTER of State for Tourism & Sport, Brendan Griffin, is today (Thursday) assuring people that he is totally confident of a positive announcement of substantial funding for the Tralee-Fenit and Listowel-Kilmorna Greenways in the coming weeks.

Minister Griffin says that a competitive application process for greenway funding has just concluded within the Department of Transport, Tourism and Sport and that both North Kerry Greenways have fared well.
He said that he is fully confident that the projects will receive the funding they need from his Department to proceed to full construction and looks forward to making the official announcement in the coming weeks.

“This is really great news for the county. The tranche of funding about to be announced is being allocated for shovel ready Greenways and we have two such projects in the county.
“I worked hard to secure a national greenway fund in Budget 2018 with Minister Shane Ross and the existence of this fund now means that both Greenways will go ahead.
“I am glad to be bringing even more funding to Kerry and these projects have the potential to be major game changers for the greater Tralee and Listowel areas.
“I look forward to working closely with Kerry County Council to ensue that the process of constructing the Greenways begins as soon as possible and I look forward to cycling on both beautiful routes before long.
“Finally, it’s important to state that a pot of funding has been reserved for projects currently going through the planning process, such as the South Kerry Greenway. I will continue to monitor developments on that project and our Department will do everything we can to assist at the appropriate time in the future.”

Magic Wands

There was a nice xmas surprise for cyclists in Tralee as flexible traffic bollards were installed to protect the cycle lanes at the north end of Denny Street.

The cycle lanes which were installed almost 2 years ago as part of the Active Travel Town project have been of little use to cyclists due to illegal parking.

In response to this Kerry County council resorted to blocking the cycle lanes with barriers, which of course also rendered them useless to cyclists.

Part of the issue was the use of the cycle lanes as an adhoc taxi rank due to a dispute regarding the re-designation of taxi locations as part of the traffic realignment in the town centre .

Now to see how long they will last !